Are Freckles the Remnants of Our Black Ancestors?

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I have always wondered if freckles and/or dark moles on white skin is a reminder of black ancestry. A mole is a spot, mark, or small permanent inherited protuberance on the body. Also known as a pigmentary nevus. In medicine, pigmentary refers to an excessive deposit of color. Pigmentary also refers to a birthmark.

During the 1980’s, in an attempt to understand skin cancer in children, the Germans studied almost nineteen-hundred children and one or both of their parents. Combing through the study I saw this phrase, “Freckles are thought to represent clones of mutated melanocytes.”

Melano means black, dark. Having black hair and dark skin is melanic, stemming from the word melano which means dark or black. What are the melanocytes that mutated that cloned and turned into freckles?

The “cyte” portion of the word melanocytes means connection with, relation to, derives from, etc.

Black skin > black skin mutates> black mutated skin clones itself>black mutated skin that cloned itself becomes freckles

Did I get that right?

Children whose parents had a higher number of moles on their arms and had sun-sensitive skin and freckles on their face were more prone to lesions that lead to melanoma. In case you’re wondering, the study recommends that parents protect their children against mild to moderate sun exposure, use sun-protective clothing, seek shade and keep the kids out of the sun when it is most intense. Unfortunately, I don’t think sunscreen can be trusted. And avoiding the sun entirely is not an option. Our bodies make Vitamin D when the oils on our skin are exposed to sunlight. Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy V – Black, White and Hamite; Ancestors of Color in Our Family Trees.  Available here:Small Size FRONT Canva Cover Secret Genealogy V

Ebook: https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-Hamite-Ancestors-Family-ebook/dp/B01HJ622DU

Paperback: https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-Hamite-Ancestors-Family/dp/153518972X

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